Welcoming Spring with: Seared Cod and Ratatouille


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Today is the first day of spring, which also happens to be Persian New Year, marking the first day in the Iranian calendar. “Nowruz,” the Persian New Year, begins at the exact moment of the vernal equinox, when the sun crosses the equator and winter ends.

I mention this because my boyfriend is Persian, and it’s an important holiday celebrated by his family. Every year I’m invited to his parents’ home to enjoy a feast of traditional, delicious Persian food, and I must say that I am super excited for dinner tonight.

Beyond all the food, I know little about the new year traditions, so I spent some time online today to read about the holiday. Apparently it’s tradition to do an intensive, complete cleaning of the house in the weeks before the new year, signifying the “rebirth of nature.” I guess Persians used to believe that guardian angels and spirits of the dead would come down to earth to visit their human counter parts, so they cleaned and prepared a welcome feast for their visit. Well…I definitely won’t be expecting a visit from “spirits of the dead.” Since I didn’t get the spring-cleaning memo, my home is in no condition for special visitors.

On the last Tuesday before the new year, bonfires are made and people jump over the flames, believing it will rid them of illnesses and misfortunes in the new year. I wasn’t invited to this important ritual, so now I fear for my health and fortune this year.

It’s also custom to buy at least one set of brand new clothing or shoes for the new year. (Do two new pairs of running shoes count?)

Persians set up an elaborate table setting of seven symbolic items, called Haft Sin, each item corresponding to one of the seven creations and the seven holy immortals protecting them.

sabzeh – wheat, barley or lentil sprouts growing in a dish – symbolizing rebirth

samanu – a sweet pudding made from wheat germ – symbolizing affluence

senjed – the dried fruit of the oleaster tree – symbolizing love

sīr – garlic – symbolizing medicine

sīb – apples – symbolizing beauty and health

somaq – sumac berries – symbolizing (the color of) sunrise

serkeh – vinegar – symbolizing age and patience.

But above all else, like any other holiday, it’s about enjoying friends, family and feasting. Now that–I can appreciate.

In honor of Nowruz I get a night off from cooking. But since it’s custom to eat fish for Persian New Year, I thought I’d share a fish recipe. It’s not a Persian dish, but it will feel like spring when you eat it!

Seared Cod over Ratatouille

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Makes 4 servings.

INGREDIENTS:

1 pound cod filet

1 large eggplant, cut into small cubes

1 onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 can diced, fire roasted tomatoes

2 medium zucchini, chopped

2 T balsamic vinegar

1 red bell pepper, diced

1 cup cherry tomatoes, sliced in half (I used yellow tomatoes)

1 portabella mushroom, chopped (or 1 cup sliced mushrooms)

¼ cup fresh basil, chopped

½ tsp. paprika

1 lemon

1-2 T olive oil

cayenne (optional)

salt and pepper to taste

In a large pot, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. When the pot is hot, add onions, and sauté until translucent.

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Add eggplant, mushrooms, zucchini and bell pepper and sauté until soft. Turn heat down to medium and add garlic, fire roasted tomatoes, paprika, cayenne. Simmer on low about 5 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

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While the ratatouille is cooking, salt and pepper the fish. Squirt on juice from half of the lemon. Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. Sear the cod for about 3 minutes on each side, just until it has a nice brown crust and flakes easily with a fork.

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Just before serving, salt and pepper the ratatouille to your taste, and stir in chopped basil. You can also add other fresh herbs to this dish, like parsley, oregano, thyme, etc. Serve the cod on top of the ratatouille, squirt the other half of the lemon on top of the cooked fish, and enjoy!

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RECIPE- Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS:

1 pound cod filet

1 large eggplant, cut into small cubes

1 onion, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 can diced, fire roasted tomatoes

2 medium zucchini, chopped

2 T balsamic vinegar

1 red bell pepper, diced

1 portabella mushroom, chopped (or 1 cup sliced mushrooms)

¼ cup fresh basil, chopped

½ tsp. paprika

1 lemon

1-2 T olive oil

cayenne (optional)

salt and pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

In a large pot, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. When the pot is hot, add onions, and sauté until translucent. Add eggplant, mushrooms, zucchini and bell pepper and sauté until soft. Turn heat down to medium and add garlic, fire roasted tomatoes, paprika, cayenne. Simmer on low about 5 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

While the ratatouille is cooking, salt and pepper the fish. Squirt on juice from half of the lemon. Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. Sear the cod for about 3 minutes on each side, just until it has a nice brown crust and flakes easily with a fork.

Just before serving, salt and pepper the ratatouille to your taste, and stir in chopped basil. You can also add other fresh herbs to this dish, like parsley, oregano, thyme, etc.

Serve the cod on top of the ratatouille, squirt the other half of the lemon on top of the cooked fish, and enjoy!

Surviving Pi Day with: Orange Chicken


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It’s Pi Day, and I guess the thing to do is celebrate the day by eating pie (If you don’t know what Pi Day is, read about it here: http://www.piday.org).

In my opinion, it’s a genius, loosely related excuse to gorge on all things pie. My coworkers decided to make an event of it by having a pie potluck at lunch…with a total of 35 sweet and savory pies to share. Strawberry-blueberry thyme pie, chocolate peanut butter pie, lemon mascarpone pie, sweet potato bacon pie, cheese and spinach pie, smore pie…and just about every other pie you could dream up. Amazing, right?

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BEFORE

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AFTER

Well…no. I’m on day 17 of my dessert-free Lent, and I have “bad reactions” to dairy, so I forced myself to celebrate at a safe distance with my veggie curry and spinach. So far I’m surviving OK, enduring just a few difficult times resisting a fudgy brownie cake at a wedding, and a homemade coconut cream pie that my little sister begged me to eat. But, I prevailed!

I’ve refocused my sugar-craving energy on real food, fueling my body with what it needs to run better, and finding inspiration to try new recipes.

I decided to try a new recipe that recently caught my eye—Paleo orange chicken. Except it’s not Paleo, because I used soy sauce, rice vinegar and rice wine. (If you really want to make the recipe Paleo you can go to: http://www.health-bent.com/poultry/paleo-orange-chicken.)

This meal took me less than 30 minutes to make, and it was full of flavor! I served it with sautéed snow peas, mushrooms and zucchini, and a side of brown rice. I barely missed dessert at all.  Well, OK, some ripe mango and juicy pineapple slices also did the trick. 😉

Seventeen more days to go!

Healthified Orange Chicken

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Serves two.

INGREDIENTS: 

1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite-sized chunks

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 T ginger, minced

4 T soy sauce

2 T mirin wine

2 T rice vinegar

1 tsp. orange zest

juice of two large oranges

1-2 tsp. spicy chile sauce or Sriracha, or modify to your taste

sliced green onions, optional

1 T sesame oil

pepper, to taste

 In a large skillet over medium-high heat, cook chicken in sesame oil until browned on all sides. Scrape up browned bits on the bottom of pan.

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Turn down heat to medium and add garlic and ginger. Mix with the chicken quickly so the garlic and ginger don’t burn to the bottom of the pan.

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Add soy sauce, mirin wine and rice vinegar. Gently stir and let cook for a minute or two. Add orange juice and chile sauce, and simmer until the sauce thickens. This recipe doesn’t really make extra sauce, so if you like to have sauce to spoon over your rice, you can easily double the sauce recipe. When the sauce is thick and the chicken is cooked through, turn off the heat, and add orange zest and green onions. Top with fresh-cracked pepper, if desired.

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Yeees…

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Yeeeeeeeess…almost there..

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Mmmmm.

 

Orange Chicken Recipe

Serves two.

Ingredients:

1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite-sized chunks

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 T ginger, minced

4 T soy sauce

2 T mirin wine

2 T rice vinegar

1 tsp. orange zest

juice of two large oranges

1-2 tsp. spicy chile sauce or Sriracha, or modify to your taste

sliced green onions, optional

1 T sesame oil

pepper, to taste

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, cook chicken in sesame oil until browned on all sides. Scrape up browned bits on the bottom of pan. Turn down heat to medium and add garlic and ginger. Mix with the chicken quickly so the garlic and ginger don’t burn to the bottom of the pan. Add soy sauce, mirin wine and rice vinegar. Gently stir and let cook for a minute or two. Add orange juice and chile sauce, and simmer until the sauce thickens. This recipe doesn’t really make extra sauce, so if you like to have sauce to spoon over your rice, you can easily double the sauce recipe. When the sauce is thick and the chicken is cooked through, turn off the heat, and add orange zest and green onions. Top with fresh-cracked pepper, if desired.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooking with Corneal Abrasions: Italian Moussaka


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My mom just celebrated her 50th birthday this past weekend. I agreed to throw her a party, as I do every year. She invites about 15 of her friends to my house, I make a variety of food and order her a nice bakery cake, and we drink wine and laugh the night away.

Well this year, she wanted to go big. A “memorable” party for her big 5-0…because apparently my previous parties for her weren’t memorable enough. So she invited about 50 people, forcing me to find a venue to rent for the party—and a strategic way to prepare and store crazy amounts of food in my fridge.

In Filipino culture, the worst, most tragic, embarrassing, shameful thing that could ever happen to a party host is to run out of food. So when I host parties for about 20 people, I prepare enough food to feed 30-40 people. I leave out Ziploc bags and aluminum foil, and Filipino women happily pack up the leftovers to bring to their husbands.

So this year, knowing 50 people were on the guest list, I planned a menu for an army. I shopped at one of those grocery stores that are designed for restaurant owners and left with a 19-pound pork loin, 18 pounds of chicken legs, 5 pounds of ground turkey for tamale casserole, 4 bags of rigatoni and giant aluminum catering serving pans.  I even asked people for HELP—which I rarely do.

Friday night before the party, I started prepping all the food. As I was chopping onions, my eye started burning like I rubbed jalapeno into it. I figured it would go away in a few minutes, but it continued through the evening. I woke up with a red eyeball, twitchy swollen eyelid, blurry vision and tears uncontrollably streaming down my face.

My plan was to shake it off, power through the day and hope it would just go away. But my boyfriend convinced me to go to urgent care, and I found out that I gave myself a “corneal abrasion,” a scratch on my cornea from rubbing my eyes too much with my contacts in. I spent the rest of the day twitching my right eyelid while trying to maneuver around the kitchen practically blind, cooking and transporting ridiculous amounts of food.

Despite this setback, once the numbing eye drops and ibuprofen kicked in, everything went well. The food was good, my mom had a good time, and best of all—the party is over!

The next day, my abs were sore and my body felt bruised from lifting the serving pans. My eye still isn’t 100 percent, but at least I didn’t lose it.

Somehow, after all that, I was able to get myself back in the kitchen again. I’ve been craving moussaka, a traditional Greek dish, that I make not-so-traditional. So I’m calling it “Italian moussaka”…or maybe even “Greek lasagna.” It’s basically a lasagna made with eggplant and potatoes in place of noodles. And, since I’m dairy free, I made a non-dairy béchamel-type sauce. I was nervous about how it would turn out…but it turned out well, and I will make it again! It takes some time to prepare, so I wouldn’t recommend it if you’re looking for a quick weeknight meal. You can also make it a day ahead.

Italian Moussaka

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Feeds 4-6

INGREDIENTS:

1 medium eggplant

2 large red potatoes

1 small onion, diced

2 cloves garlic, diced

2 small cans tomato sauce

1 cup spaghetti sauce

1 15 oz can fire roasted tomatoes

1/4 cup red wine

2-3 T chopped parsley

1 pound ground chicken sausage

Bechamel-type sauce

3/4 cup vegan cheese (I used Daiya)

1/2 cup nutritional yeast

1 cup non-dairy milk (I used plain almond)

1 egg white

5 oz. silken tofu

3-6 T soy sauce

pepper to taste

1-2 T dijon mustard

fresh cracked pepper, to taste

Cut eggplant into 1/4- inch thick slices. You can leave the skin on or peel it off, it’s up to you. Spread eggplant slices out on a tray, in a colander or on cutting boards. Sprinkle generously with salt, and let them sit for about 30 minutes, or until you can see the liquid pool at the top. Rinse the salt off the eggplant and try to squeeze out excess liquid. This is supposed to remove some of the bitterness from the eggplant.

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While you let the eggplants sit, chop onion and garlic. Heat about a tablespoon of oil in a pan over medium-high heat. Add onions and saute until they just start to caramelize.

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Add the ground chicken sausage and saute until browned and cooked through.

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Add garlic, fire roasted tomatoes, tomato sauce, spaghetti sauce and wine. Turn down heat and let the sauce simmer until it’s time to assemble the moussaka. Stir in parsley.

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To make the bechamel sauce, add all the ingredients to a blender or food processor, except the vegan cheese. Blend until creamy. Stir in the vegan cheese, and set aside. *Note: If you sample the sauce before cooking it, it won’t taste very good. Once it’s baked it tastes good, haha.

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Nutritional Yeast

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The sauce has a pretty color here….but once it’s cooked it looks weird and brownish green…

Slice potatoes as thinly as possible. Lightly salt each slice.

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To assemble, spray a coat of non-stick spray in an 8×11 pan. Spread a layer of eggplant on the bottom of the pan.

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Top the eggplant layer with about 1 cup of the chicken sausage tomato sauce mixture.

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Spread on a layer of potatoes.

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Top with a cup of the tomato sauce mixture. Repeat until you run out of eggplant and potato. Finish with a generous layer of the tomato sauce.

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Bake the moussaka for about 25 minutes at 400 degrees.

Pour the bechamel sauce over the top. You may not need all of it, I had about a cup leftover that I will use later for mac n’ cheese. Bake another 25 minutes or until the potatoes are cooked through and the bechamel sauce is set. Let sit for about 10 minutes before serving to let the casserole firm up, and it won’t be a runny mess. Cut into slices and serve with a side salad, or roasted brussels sprouts. Or enjoy alone, it’s a complete meal!

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It’s not very pretty since it’s not real cheese…but I promise it’s good!

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Italian Moussaka Recipe:

Cut eggplant into 1/4- inch thick slices. You can leave the skin on or peel it off, it’s up to you. Spread eggplant slices out on a tray, in a colander or on cutting boards. Sprinkle generously with salt, and let them sit for about 30 minutes, or until you can see the liquid pool at the top. Rinse the salt off the eggplant and try to squeeze out excess liquid. This is supposed to remove some of the bitterness from the eggplant.

While you let the eggplants sit, chop onion and garlic. Heat about a tablespoon of oil in a pan over medium-high heat. Add onions and saute until they just start to caramelize. Add the ground chicken sausage and saute until browned and cooked through. Add garlic, fire roasted tomatoes, tomato sauce, spaghetti sauce and wine. Turn down heat and let the sauce simmer.

To make the bechamel sauce, add all the ingredients to a blender or food processor, except the vegan cheese. Blend until creamy. Stir in the vegan cheese, and set aside. Note: If you sample the sauce before cooking it, it won’t taste very good. Once it’s baked it tastes good, haha. 

Slice potatoes as thinly as possible. Lightly salt each slice.

To assemble, spray a coat of non-stick spray in an 8×11 pan. Spread a layer of eggplant on the bottom of the pan. Top the eggplant layer with about 1 cup of the chicken sausage tomato sauce mixture. Spread on a layer of potatoes. Top with a cup of the tomato sauce mixture. Repeat until you run out of eggplant and potato. Finish with a generous layer of the tomato sauce.

Bake the moussaka for about 25 minutes at 400 degrees.

Pour the bechamel sauce over the top. You may not need all of it, I had about a cup leftover that I will use later for mac n’ cheese. Bake another 25 minutes or until the potatoes are cooked through and the bechamel sauce is set. Let sit for about 10 minutes before serving to let the casserole firm up, and it won’t be a runny mess. 

 

Undoing ‘over-doing’ with: Dal (lentils)


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I recently came to the realization that I’m an over-doer.

The past month, I’ve been battling a hamstring injury that resulted from “over-doing” it. After a few lazy weeks, I felt inspired to get a jump-start on my marathon training with a 12-mile hilly run (after doing a 9-mile run two days earlier). Followed by a 4-mile walk on the waterfront, and dancing the night away in strappy heels.

On Christmas Eve, I hosted a “small” brunch for 13 friends. While people were still mingling over mimosas, I was in the kitchen whipping up coffee cake for my boyfriend’s family–one of six baked goods I planned to bring them for Christmas dessert. Why six things, not one or two? I have no idea.

And last year, we celebrated Valentine’s Day three times, for three entire days.

Three.

…Birthdays, anniversaries and promotions are celebrated the same way.

So I’ve decided to simplify things–starting with this simple lentil dish, dal. It’s so simple, it only has 3 letters (sometimes 4, daal). It’s as simple as simple can get: lentils, water, onion and spices.

It’s not exactly an authentic Indian recipe, but I’ve adapted this recipe from how my Persian boyfriend and his mom prepare it. You can serve it as a side dish, or eat it as a vegetarian main dish over brown rice with a side of roasted veggies of your choice.

This is as simple as it will get for me…my mom’s 50th birthday party is this weekend, 50 people are coming, and I will be over-doing it. So at least for today…I can just breathe. Ahhhhhhh.

Dal

Serves about 8 as a side dish, 4 as a main dish

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2 tsp. cooking oil

1 cup imported red lentils

1 cup yellow split peas (optional, add 1 more cup of lentils if you omit these)

6 cups water

1 large onion, diced and/or chopped (I like to do half diced, half chopped in bigger chunks or strips)

2-3 T turmeric

1/2 tsp chili powder

1/2 tsp cumin

1/2 tsp cayenne (optional)

1/4 tsp paprika

1/4 tsp coriander

1/2 tsp garlic powder

salt and pepper to taste

*Note* If you don’t want to buy a bunch of different spices, you can buy curry powder from the grocery store and omit all the other spices, EXCEPT the turmeric. Use about 1 to 2 T.

Use imported red lentils. I get these from my local middle eastern grocer. You might also be able to find them at a regular grocery store, either in the bulk aisle or the ethnic foods aisle. They’re smaller and flatter than regular lentils, and they become creamy when cooked. I also like to use yellow split peas for texture, but you don’t have to. Just add an extra cup of red lentils if you choose to skip the split peas.

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Dice or chop your onion. I failed to grocery shop so I ended up having to use half of a red onion and half of a yellow onion. Doesn’t really make a difference. I like to dice half my onion, and chop the other half in bigger chunks. Just adds texture, but it’s ultimately up to you!

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Heat oil in a pot over medium heat. When the oil is hot, add onions. Saute until slightly softened. Add spices to onion, mixing to coat onions with the spices, and saute another minute.

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Add lentils and split peas to the onion and spices, and mix well.

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Add about 3 to 4 cups of water to the pot. Cover and let simmer about 10 minutes. Make sure to keep an eye on the pot because the lentils will soak up the water, and the lentils could burn to the bottom of the pot (You may have to add more or less water than the 6 cups this recipe calls for, depending on how quickly your lentils soak up the water. Turn down heat if necessary.). Add remaining 2 cups of water and simmer another 15-20 minutes on low to medium-low heat.

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The lentils should look thick and creamy like this when it’s done. The split peas take longer to cook than the lentils, so taste one of the split peas to check if it’s done. It should be soft! You can always add more water if it seems too thick, or if the lentils seem to be sticking to the bottom of the pan. Add salt and pepper to your taste.

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Serve over brown rice with roasted veggies to make it a meal! Or, serve as a side dish. I ate it with lemon saffron chicken that Novin made…recipe to come, later!

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Enjoy!

RECIPE

Dal

2 tsp. cooking oil

1 cup imported red lentils

1 cup yellow split peas (optional, add 1 more cup of lentils if you omit these)

6 cups water

1 large onion, diced and/or chopped (I like to do half diced, half chopped in bigger chunks or strips)

2-3 T turmeric

1/2 tsp chili powder

1/2 tsp cumin

1/2 tsp cayenne (optional)

1/4 tsp paprika

1/4 tsp coriander

1/2 tsp garlic powder

salt and pepper to taste

*Note* If you don’t want to buy a bunch of different spices, you can buy curry powder from the grocery store and omit all the other spices, EXCEPT the turmeric. Use about 1 to 2 T.

Use imported red lentils. I get these from my local middle eastern grocer. You might also be able to find them at a regular grocery store, either in the bulk aisle or the ethnic foods aisle. They’re smaller and flatter than regular lentils, and they become creamy when cooked. I also like to use yellow split peas for texture, but you don’t have to. Just add an extra cup of red lentils if you choose to skip the split peas.

Dice or chop your onion. I failed to grocery shop so I ended up having to use half of a red onion and half of a yellow onion. Doesn’t really make a difference. I like to dice half my onion, and chop the other half in bigger chunks. Just adds texture, but it’s ultimately up to you!

Heat oil in a pot over medium heat. When the oil is hot, add onions. Saute until slightly softened. Add spices to onion, mixing to coat onions with the spices, and saute another minute.

Add lentils and split peas to the onion and spices, and mix well.

Add about 3 to 4 cups of water to the pot. Cover and let simmer about 10 minutes. Make sure to keep an eye on the pot because the lentils will soak up the water, and the lentils could burn to the bottom of the pot (You may have to add more or less water than the 6 cups this recipe calls for, depending on how quickly your lentils soak up the water. Turn down heat if necessary.). Add remaining 2 cups of water and simmer another 15-20 minutes on low to medium-low heat.

The lentils should look thick and creamy like this when it’s done. The split peas take longer to cook than the lentils, so taste one of the split peas to check if it’s done. It should be soft! You can always add more water if it seems too thick, or if the lentils seem to be sticking to the bottom of the pan. Add salt and pepper to your taste.

Serve over brown rice with roasted veggies to make it a meal! Or, serve as a side dish. I ate it with lemon saffron chicken that Novin made…recipe to come, later!

Quitting TV with: Teriyaki Salmon and Asian Cabbage ‘Slaw


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It’s 17 days into the new year, and I’ve been completely TV-free. NO Modern Family, no Happy Endings, no New Girl, no Mike and Molly, no Two and a Half Men, no Two Broke Girls, no Whitney, no Big Bang Theory, no local newscast at 4, 5, 6…and….WOW…I could go on….but it’s just now hitting me that we had a bit of a TV problem.

Giving up TV wasn’t my choice. It wasn’t really my vice either.

It was my boyfriend’s.

It all started when he got the ability to record TV shows. One-by-one, he added shows to his queue whenever a new one came out that looked interesting. Once we started watching them, he felt the need to watch EVERY episode and keep up with them weekly. When his queue started to fill up, he’d panic. If we didn’t watch all the recorded episodes and delete them, the queue would fill and stop recording new episodes. Tragically, we’d miss out on all the new episodes and have to watch them on Hulu…with commercials. Oh, the horror!

(*Novin, if you’re reading this: the next time you get the urge to start watching TV again, take note of how ridiculous this all sounds and refer back to this blog post regularly. Please and thank you.)

So anyway, he resolved to stop watching TV during the week and instead use his evenings to work on other projects, and learn! It’s working out quite nicely, even for me. For one, I have much more free time for cooking special meals…and blogging! And we actually sit at the table while we have dinner and….talk! Converse! What a concept! Even our cat joins us at an empty seat.

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Said cat joining us for dinner.

We get to enjoy every bite of the meal in front of us….sloooowly. Well, I eat slowly. He finishes several minutes before me then stands on the heating vent, or takes a couple laps around the kitchen until I finish dinner. Ha.

Here’s a recipe for my teriyaki salmon and cabbage slaw, one of the meals we had time to prepare together because we weren’t watching TV!

Teriyaki Salmon

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Makes 2-3 servings

Ingredients

1 pound salmon (we kept skin on, but you can remove it if you want)

½ cup low-sodium soy sauce

½ cup mirin (can be found in the vinegar section of Asian grocers)

2 T sugar

1 T rice vinegar

1 garlic clove

2 thin slices of fresh ginger

salt and pepper, optional

green onions to garnish, optional

To make the sauce, add soy sauce, mirin, sugar, garlic clove and ginger to a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a boil for 2-3 minutes, while stirring. Turn down heat to low and simmer the sauce another 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. The sauce should begin to thicken (When you remove it from heat it will continue to thicken). Remove the garlic clove and ginger chunks.

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Lightly brush your salmon with sesame oil, and lightly salt and pepper your salmon on both sides.  Heat a pan (preferably cast iron) to medium-high heat. If you are using salmon with skin on, put the salmon in the pan with skin side down first. Sear for about 3 to 4 minutes, then flip over to other side. Brush salmon with a little bit of teriyaki sauce. Cook for an additional 2 minutes or so. Your cooking time will vary depending on how thick your salmon is.  Rule of thumb is to cook until the fish flakes easily with a fork.

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Transfer the salmon to a plate as soon as it’s done cooking so it won’t over cook, then brush a desired amount of the teriyaki sauce on top. Garnish with sliced green onions, if desired.

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Asian Cabbage ‘Slaw

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Makes 4-6 servings

Ingredients

½ head cabbage, shredded or finely chopped

1 to 2 carrots, shredded

1/3 cup red onion, finely sliced or diced

2 to 3 T toasted sesame seeds

1 to 2 T sesame oil

½ cup rice vinegar

¼ cup water

salt and pepper to taste

cayenne (optional)

green onions to garnish, optional

In a small bowl, whisk vinegar, water and sesame oil.

In a large bowl, add shredded/chopped cabbage, shredded carrots, 1 T sesame seeds and red onion. Mix in dressing. Add salt, pepper and cayenne to your taste and mix well. You can also add more sesame oil if you like that strong flavor. Garnish with 1 T sesame seeds and sliced green onions, if desired. Serve with teriyaki salmon and brown rice for a complete meal!

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ENJOY!

Teriyaki Salmon

1 pound salmon (we kept skin on, but you can remove it if you want)

½ cup low-sodium soy sauce

½ cup mirin (can be found in the vinegar section of Asian grocers)

2 T sugar

1 T rice vinegar

1 garlic clove

2 thin slices of fresh ginger

salt and pepper, optional

green onions to garnish, optional

To make the sauce, add soy sauce, mirin, sugar, garlic clove and ginger to a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a boil for 2-3 minutes, while stirring. Turn down heat to low and simmer the sauce another 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. The sauce should begin to thicken (When you remove it from heat it will continue to thicken). Remove the garlic clove and ginger chunks.

Lightly brush your salmon with sesame oil, and lightly salt and pepper your salmon on both sides.  Heat a pan (preferably cast iron) to medium-high heat. If you are using salmon with skin on, put the salmon in the pan with skin side down first. Sear for about 3 to 4 minutes, then flip over to other side. Brush salmon with a little bit of teriyaki sauce. Cook for an additional 2 minutes or so. Your cooking time will vary depending on how thick your salmon is.  Rule of thumb is to cook until the fish flakes easily with a fork.

Transfer the salmon to a plate as soon as it’s done cooking so it won’t over cook, then brush a desired amount of the teriyaki sauce on top. Garnish with sliced green onions, if desired.

Asian Cabbage ‘Slaw

½ head cabbage, shredded or finely chopped

1 to 2 carrots, shredded

1/3 cup red onion, finely sliced or diced

2 to 3 T toasted sesame seeds

1 to 2 T sesame oil

½ cup rice vinegar

¼ cup water

salt and pepper to taste

cayenne (optional)

green onions to garnish, optional

In a small bowl, whisk vinegar, water and sesame oil.

In a large bowl, add shredded/chopped cabbage, shredded carrots, 1 T sesame seeds and red onion. Mix in dressing. Add salt, pepper and cayenne to your taste and mix well. You can also add more sesame oil if you like that strong flavor. Garnish with 1 T sesame seeds and sliced green onions, if desired. Serve with teriyaki salmon and brown rice for a complete meal!

Rejoicing new Photoshop skills with: Mini, Smoky Turkey Meatloaf and Mashed Cauliflower


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Well hello there. Happy……Halloween, Veteran’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Ramadan, Kwanzaa, New Year, and any other holiday you may have celebrated in the last four months, because that’s how long I’ve been gone from this blogging business. Yeesh.

I’ve still been hard at work in the kitchen, but a new job, marathon #3, and a web design class at my local community college left me with no motivation to pick up my camera. I may have neglected my food blog for months, but at least now I know how to erase the appearance of wrinkles on an old lady’s face in Photoshop. I can also alter an image of my lazy cat in a pink hippo suit on the couch, to appear as if she’s adventurously leaping off Pier 39 in San Francisco.

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Hey. Don’t judge. It’s a valuable skill I might need to utilize someday. If not, well, I still have this blog.

Now that it’s 2013, life is back to normal and I’m starting off the year with healthy, satisfying, complete meal ideas––in preparation for my Caribbean cruise vacation next month.

To start, I decided to make mini turkey meatloaves and mashed cauliflower. It’s much lighter than traditional meatloaf and mashed potatoes, but still tastes like comfort food. With this meal, you’ll be able to survive through chilly, dreary January, without packing extra poundage. It’s so tasty, you won’t even miss the mashed potatoes! Serve with a side of salad greens with balsamic vinaigrette and you’ve got one tasty weeknight dinner.

Mini, Smoky Turkey Meatloaf 

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Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

19 oz. ground turkey (That’s just the odd, prepackaged amount I bought. I’d highly recommend substituting half the turkey for ground chicken sausage, for more flavor.)

2-3 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 of a medium onion, diced

1/2 cup milk (I used unsweetened almond milk)

1/2 – 2/3 cup quick-oats oatmeal

1 egg

1/2 tsp. liquid smoke (optional)

1 can tomato sauce

a pinch of cayenne pepper

1/2 tsp. garlic powder

1/4 tsp. chili powder

1/4 tsp. onion powder

1/2 tsp. paprika

1/2 tsp. salt (or to your taste)

generous amount of fresh cracked pepper

ketchup (optional)

You can add seasonings such as basil, oregano, thyme or parsley if you want to add extra flavor.

You don’t have to do this if you want to save time, but I started by sautéing the onions until they started to caramelize, just for some added depth of flavor. In a large bowl, mix together spices. Add the oatmeal, egg, milk, onion, liquid smoke, and mix. I got too excited and threw everything on top of the meat…but then the flavor doesn’t distribute as evenly. Don’t do what I did. Ha.

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Don’t do this.

Add the ground turkey to the mixture (and the ground chicken sausage if you choose, which please do), and mix well. Add about 3 tablespoons of the tomato sauce to the meat, and mix in. If for some reason you find that your meat mixture is too wet, you can always add more oatmeal.

Spray a muffin tin with non-stick spray.  Press some of the meat mixture into each of the muffin cups, leaving a little bit of room at the top of each cup, to add sauce later.

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Bake for about 20 minutes at 350 degrees. Add the remaining tomato sauce and/or ketchup to the top of each mini loaf, then cook for another 10-15 minutes. Serve with mashed cauliflower (recipe below). Enjoy!

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Mashed Cauliflower

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Makes about 4 servings

Ingredients:

1 head of cauliflower, washed

1/4 cup cheese (Trader Joe’s vegan cheese for me!)

1/2 tsp. Cajun seasoning (optional)

salt and pepper to taste

2-3 cans chicken or vegetable broth

2-3 cloves garlic

1/4 tsp. garlic powder (optional)

Cut a whole head of cauliflower into big chunks, and put in a large pot.

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Add 2-3 cans of chicken or vegetable broth, garlic and water.  The cauliflower doesn’t have to be completely covered by liquid, but most of it should be.  Cover the pot with a lid to keep moisture in, and boil for about 15 minutes or until soft enough to mash easily with a potato masher. When cauliflower is soft enough, pour out most of the liquid, leaving just a little for moisture and flavor. Mash until creamy like mashed potatoes.

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You can get creative with your seasonings. I like to add Cajun seasoning, salt, pepper and vegan cheese to keep it simple.

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P.S. I am now making it much easier for you to follow my recipes without having to scroll up and down through the images. Hope that helps!

Mini, Smoky Turkey Meatloaf

Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

19 oz. ground turkey (That’s just the odd, prepackaged amount I bought. I’d highly recommend substituting half the turkey for ground chicken sausage, for more flavor.)

2-3 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 of a medium onion, diced

1/2 cup milk (I used unsweetened almond milk)

1/2 – 2/3 cup quick-oats oatmeal

1 egg

1/2 tsp. liquid smoke (optional)

1 can tomato sauce

a pinch of cayenne pepper

1/2 tsp. garlic powder

1/4 tsp. chili powder

1/4 tsp. onion powder

1/2 tsp. paprika

1/2 tsp. salt (alter to your taste)

generous amount of fresh cracked pepper

ketchup (optional)

You can add seasonings such as basil, oregano, thyme or parsley if you want to add extra flavor.

You don’t have to do this if you want to save time, but I started by sautéing the onions until they started to caramelize, just for some added depth of flavor. In a large bowl, mix together spices. Add the oatmeal, egg, milk, liquid smoke, and mix. I got too excited and threw everything on top of the meat…but then the flavor doesn’t distribute as evenly. Don’t do what I did. Ha. Add the ground turkey to the mixture (and the ground chicken sausage if you choose, which please do), and mix well. Add about 3 tablespoons of the tomato sauce to the meat, and mix in. If for some reason you find that your meat mixture is too wet, you can always add more oatmeal. Spray a muffin tin with non-stick spray.  Press some of the meat mixture into each of the muffin cups, leaving a little bit of room at the top of each cup, to add sauce later. Bake for about 20 minutes at 350 degrees. Add the remaining tomato sauce and/or ketchup to the top of each mini loaf, then cook for another 10-15 minutes. Serve with mashed cauliflower (recipe below).

Mashed Cauliflower

Makes about 4 servings

Ingredients:

1 head of cauliflower, washed

1/4 cup cheese (Trader Joe’s vegan cheese for me!)

1/2 tsp. Cajun seasoning (optional)

salt and pepper to taste

2-3 cans chicken or vegetable broth

2-3 cloves garlic

1/4 tsp. garlic powder (optional)

Cut a whole head of cauliflower into big chunks, and put in a large pot. Add 2-3 cans of chicken or vegetable broth, garlic and water.  The cauliflower doesn’t have to be completely covered by liquid, but most of it should be.  Cover the pot with a lid to keep moisture in, and boil for about 15 minutes or until soft enough to mash easily with a potato masher. When cauliflower is soft enough, pour out most of the liquid, leaving just a little for moisture and flavor. Mash until creamy like mashed potatoes. You can get creative with your seasonings. I like to add Cajun seasoning, salt, pepper and vegan cheese to keep it simple.

Detoxing from Vacation Food Crimes with Chicken Lettuce Wraps


 

My boyfriend and I recently celebrated our five-year anniversary. Five years seems like quite a long time so we decided to plan something exciting to celebrate. A friend of mine suggested we take a mini road trip down to Jacksonville, a cute little town in Southern Oregon. She mentioned wine tasting, a steam shower and champagne brunch so that was enough to convince us. We packed up our bags, arranged a kitty-sitter and headed south.

Jacksonville is about a 5 hour drive from Portland, Oregon and just 20 miles from Ashland and the award-winning Oregon Shakespeare Festival. It was the first town in America to be named a National Historic Landmark, founded in 1851 following a discovery of gold deposits. Naturally, the town has an “old west” feel, with a corner saloon and a gun shop. Adorable! But I must say I’ve never been anywhere quite like it. Jacksonville is an outdoor, wine, food, music and art lover’s paradise. It is home of the Britt Festival, a summer outdoor music and performing arts festival, where you can bring your own picnic, beer and wine! Countless vineyards and wineries are just minutes from town, with several tasting rooms just steps from our hotel.

Wine tasting at Red Lily Vineyards, just 10 minutes from downtown Jacksonville.

We were lucky enough to stay in one of the 8 rooms at the Jacksonville Inn. We stayed in the Patrick J. Ryan room, the only one equipped with a steam shower. I had no idea what a steam shower was before I came to the inn, and let me tell you, the experience changed me. Imagine…a steam room…in a shower. You can shower…and steam! At the same time! In the mornings I enjoyed runs with views of vineyards and farmland, then came back to the inn for a refreshing steam shower. In the evenings after a long day of hiking, eating and wine tasting, I would unwind and prepare for sleep with another steam shower.

This was my view on my morning runs! Then afterwards…I drank wine at this vineyard!

Mr. Steam is his name! My best friend.

Each morning until 10 a.m. the inn provided freshly baked biscotti, hot coffee, and tea, so after my morning runs we spent the remainder of the mornings before breakfast laying in bed, reading magazines and watching cable TV while enjoying our coffee and biscotti.

Every morning should start this way.

A delicious made-to-order breakfast was included daily in our stay, with options like belgian waffles, breakfast skillets, omelets, blueberry pancakes, croissant french toast and more. On Sundays the inn serves a special brunch menu with free flowing champagne, assorted pastries and fruit.

Smoked Salmon Frittata

Smoked Salmon Benedict

Denver Omelet

Me getting excited for assorted breakfast pastries!

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I love when my toilet paper rolls are made into roses.

View from the summit of Lower Table Rock in Central Point, just 15 minutes from Jacksonville.

Just a 15-minute drive from Jacksonville is Table Rocks in Central Point where we burned off our breakfasts on a one hour round-trip hike up Lower Table Rock to a breath-taking view of the Rogue Valley. Then following the hike…I piled the calories back on with this mondo slice of chocolate mousse cake at the Jacksonville Inn…which I ate by myself and thoroughly enjoyed.

The rest of our trip was enjoyed this way…with lots of good, local wine, delicious food (Including the best burger of my life) and relaxation. Needless to say…I am now on a ‘diet’ after all the food crimes I committed…detoxing with healthy food to undo all the damage of vacation…starting with Chicken Lettuce Wraps!

Chicken Lettuce Wraps

Ingredients

1 pound chicken, diced (I used boneless thighs, but you could also use chicken breast)

3/4 cup celery

1 small onion, diced

2-3 large cloves garlic, minced

1 cup diced bell pepper

1 cup diced mushrooms

1 cup diced water chestnuts

3/4  cup chopped green onions

2 to 3 T light soy sauce

2 to 3 T oyster sauce

2 to 3 T hoisin sauce

2 to 3 T rice vinegar

2 to 3 T sambal oelek or chili sauce (optional)

3/4 cup dried black fungus (optional-can be found in Asian grocers. Soak for about 5 minutes in boiled water.)

1 head red leaf, romaine or bibb lettuce

1 large spaghetti squash, roasted (optional but highly recommended)

Instructions 

Chop up vegetables. If using spaghetti squash, poke holes in squash using a sharp knife. Roast in a 350 degree oven for 30-40 minutes. Cut in half lengthwise, and remove seeds. Scrape out the flesh using a fork; it should come out fairly effortlessly. If it’s too hard to scrape out put back in the oven for a few more minutes. The squash will look like spaghetti noodles! Set aside squash for serving.

Dice chicken into small, bite sized pieces. The smaller the pieces, the easier it will be to wrap and eat out of the lettuce leaves.

Heat about 1 T of oil in a skillet over high heat. Add chicken and cook until browned. Add onion and garlic and saute for a minute or two. Add the remaining vegetables (except spaghetti squash) and cook 2 to 3 minutes. Don’t overcook the vegetables or the lettuce wraps won’t have that nice “crunch.”

Add soy sauce, rice vinegar, oyster sauce, hoisin sauce, chili sauce. You can modify the sauce amounts to your taste…If you like it saucier, add more of each ingredient. Pluck off whole lettuce leaves from the head, wash thoroughly and shake off excess water. Pat down with paper towels if necessary. Add chicken mixture to lettuce leaves, top with spaghetti squash, wrap up and eat!

 

Enjoy!

On a Budget: Stuffed Buffalo Chicken Burgers


I’ve been feeling poor lately.

Six months ago I made a wish: I wished that my friends would start getting married so I’d finally get invited to weddings.

Silly, I know. But…I’d get to drink lovely wines, eat delicious cuisine, taste fancy cakes and dance the night away under the stars. Well…I got my wish…sorta…but my dwindling bank account wasn’t part of the wish.

It seems like all our friends decided that “Summer 2012” was the perfect time to get married, so Novin and I have attended four weddings in three months, with more still to come…That doesn’t include the engagement parties, bridal showers and bachelorette parties! I’m sure many of you could beat that number, but at age 25, this is just the start of friends getting married. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not complaining…I’m EXTREMELY happy for all of them (and love weddings), but I can’t help but notice the toll wedding-gift giving is taking on my bank account. Not to mention…costs associated with being in the bridal party and travel and hotel expenses for destination weddings.

I decided that some serious budget cuts were in order. No more $4 pints of coconut milk ice cream stocked up in the freezer. Fewer caramel soy lattes, more french press coffee at home. Less Friday night happy hours, more cooking at home. Poop. Where did all my fun go?

To the kitchen, that’s where. I’ve always loved to cook, but sometimes life gets so busy that it’s hard to find motivation to cook after a long day.  I often find myself in a cooking rut, bored making the same old things, and a lack of inspiration to try new dishes. Last week I cooked five nights at home and rediscovered my enjoyment for cooking (and saved some $$$!). I remembered that cooking doesn’t always have to be complicated or fancy. It just has to taste good! Wow. What a concept.

Monday night I quickly cooked up some stuffed buffalo chicken burgers and baked kale chips, and dinner was done in 30 minutes. Easy, quick, healthy, budget friendly and really yummy!

I didn’t include exact measurements in my recipe because you really can’t screw these up. It’s just a matter of forming patties and stuffing as much as you can between the patties without creating an oozing mess. You can get creative with it. And if you do end up with an oozing mess, it will be a delicious oozing mess. Don’t see a problem there.

Serves 2 to 3

Ingredients

1 pound lean ground chicken

Frank’s Red Hot Sauce (probably 2-4 tsp.)

Shredded mozzarella or blue cheese crumbles (approx. 1/4 cup)

Garlic powder (a few dashes)

Hamburger buns

Your favorite chicken or steak seasoning (I actually used a few dashes of Montreal Steak Seasoning)

salt and pepper to taste

1 T butter or canola oil (I used Smart Balance)

In a bowl, mix together ground chicken, 1 to 2 tsp. hot sauce, 1 tsp. of your favorite meat seasoning, 1 tsp. garlic powder, and a few dashes of salt and pepper. (The patties will be pretty sticky to handle. If it becomes a problem you can coat the patties with bread crumbs)

Form into 1/2- inch thick patties (4 patties if serving 2, 6 patties if serving 3). Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of cheese to the middle of half of the patties, and top with desired amount of hot sauce.

Place remaining patties without the cheese on top of the patties with cheese. Gently seal outsides of patties together with fingers to make one patty…(not sure how else to describe it! lol).  They will likely be very soft and fragile, be careful not to handle them too much or you’ll have hot sauce and cheese everywhere (might not be a bad thing)!

Heat 1 T of butter/oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook chicken burgers for about 3-4 minutes on each side to brown. Cover and cook for an additional 2 to 3 minutes to make sure burgers cook all the way through.

Oopsy, got a little carried away with the cheese!

Serve on a bun with guacamole and your favorite burger toppings (and maybe some extra cheese and hot sauce).

Enjoy! 🙂

Cooking Slow with: Slow Cooker BBQ Brisket


I’ve been a bad blogger lately, I know. I’ve done my part in the kitchen, but getting the camera out has been the challenge. The last few months have been a whirlwind…with special occasion after special occasion. After Easter there was my sisters birthday, then Mother’s Day, then my dad’s birthday, then my best friends bridal shower and Father’s Day.

Of course I volunteered to cook or bake for every single event, and I tend to get carried away. I like options. I like selection. I like to cook so there is something for everyone, no matter their taste. So when I have a dinner party, it’s not unusual for me to serve three or four main courses and five different side dishes–food occupying every inch of counter space–some dishes forced to remain on the stove top.

And I like to make everything from scratch. I know I don’t have to roast potatoes for 30 minutes when I could just boil them for 10 minutes to make potato salad. I know I don’t have to make my own whipped cream, and I certainly don’t have to make it with fresh, hand-picked-by-me-that-day strawberries. And I know I don’t have to make my own barbeque sauce from scratch, but I do, because it makes each dish taste extra special, and I feel good about what I’m serving my guests.

With summer upon us, I’ve been craving lots of barbequed meat. Steak, burgers, sausage, pork tenderloin and brisket. I’ve been eager to make brisket because it’s an easy and delicious way to feed a crowd.  So Father’s Day I decided to experiment and make my first brisket in the slow cooker, and finished it off on the grill. We don’t have a smoker, otherwise I would have gone that route. It was a huge hit with the family, and basically effortless to make! Looks like brisket will be on the menu again this weekend for Novin’s birthday barbeque. This time, BBQ Brisket sandwiches with horseradish. Stay tuned!

Slow Cooker ‘BBQ’ Brisket

Serves approximately 4-8

Ingredients

About 2 cups of your favorite BBQ sauce for cooking, plus extra for serving (The homemade recipe I like to use makes plenty: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/big-als-kc-bar-b-q-sauce/)

2 15 oz. cans of beef broth

2 T worcestershire sauce

3.5 pound brisket

About 2 T of your favorite steak seasoning (I used McCormick’s Montreal Steak Seasoning)

2 tsp. garlic powder

2 tsp. chili powder

salt and pepper to taste

Put brisket in slow cooker (fat side up), like so:

Salt and pepper on both sides. Mix spices together in a small bowl, and rub onto both sides of meat.

Pour worcestershire sauce over brisket, and the 2 cups BBQ sauce.

Marinate brisket overnight.

The next evening before cooking, add beef broth, making sure the meat is completely covered by liquid.

Turn the slow cooker on low and cook for 12 hours, overnight. If you want, grill the brisket on each side for a minute and a half on each side for extra flavor. Don’t grill any longer because it will dry the meat out. (I marinated the brisket on Friday night, then started the slow cooker at 11 p.m. on Saturday, and it was perfect for Father’s Day lunch on Sunday. It takes some planning in advance, but it’s worth it!)

Slice brisket against the grain. Brush with extra BBQ sauce and serve!

Enjoy!

What to do with 25 lbs. of grits? Spicy Stewed Beef and Cheddar Grits


I recently inherited this baby:

No, that is not a Costco bag of dog food. It is a 25-pound bag of Bob’s Red Mill corn grits that has been sitting behind my office desk for about a month now.

Why would I have grits in my office, you ask?

Well, I work for a nonprofit that promotes Oregon agriculture, and every year we have a dinner and auction to raise money for the organization. Local businesses donate food products that we use to prepare the four-course meal for the evening, and I usually inherit the leftovers. So, Mr. Bag of Corn Grits needed a home, and I agreed to take him in. He had to sit behind my desk for awhile while I thought about what to do with him. He’s pretty heavy, and I didn’t want to do any unnecessary lifting.

So the other day I finally found a recipe worthy of moving Mr. Grits out of my office and into my kitchen: Spicy Stewed Beef with Creamy Cheddar Grits. I stumbled across it on The Pioneer Woman blog, and after one look at the photo, I immediately grabbed my keys and headed out the door to shop for ingredients (minus the grits, of course).

It had all the elements for a perfect dinner on a rainy, dreary night. Spicy and warm? Mandatory. Creamy? Yes please. Filling? Absolutely.

Now that I’ve made Spicy Stewed Beef with Creamy Cheddar Grits, I am very happy that I have 24.6 pounds of grits left to use. You will likely be seeing lots of grit-related recipes on my blog from here on out…

I’m open to suggestions for recipes for all things grits–besides cornbread. Please, please, oh please send me some suggestions!

Or maybe just forward me your mailing address so I can ship some to you. Shipping costs not included. 😉

Spicy Stewed Beef with Creamy Cheddar Grits

Recipe adapted from: http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2012/01/spicy-stewed-beef-with-creamy-cheddar-grits/

Makes about 4 servings

Beef Ingredients:

1 Tablespoon Canola Oil

1 Tablespoon Butter (I used Smart Balance)

1 to 2 pounds Diced Chuck Roast

1 small can Chipotle Peppers In Adobo Sauce (It WILL be spicy!)

2 to 4 15-oz cans of Low-sodium Beef Broth (Depending on how saucy you want it. I used two cans plus a little extra)

5 cloves Minced Garlic

2 tsp. Cumin

1 teaspoon Chili Powder

Grits Ingredients:

2 T butter or canola oil

1/2 of a small Onion, finely diced

1 whole Red Bell Pepper

1 to 2 whole Chilies (any Variety, Hot Or Mild)

1 cup Bob’s Red Mill corn grits/polenta

1 1/2 cups Low Sodium Chicken (or Beef) Broth

1 1/2 to 2 1/2 cups Water

1/4 cups Half-and-half (I used soy milk since I can’t have dairy, works just fine!)

1/2 cup Grated Cheddar Cheese (I used Daiya vegan cheese, which works just fine too!)

fresh cracked pepper to taste

Spicy Stewed Beef Instructions:

Heat 1 tablespoon oil and 1 tablespoon butter in a large pot over high heat. Throw in stew meat and brown for a few minutes.

Add chipotle peppers, beef broth, garlic, cumin, and chili powder. Stir, then bring to a boil.

chipotle peppers in adobo sauce

 Reduce the heat to low, then cover and simmer for 1 to 2 hours, or until the meat is fall-apart tender and the liquid is thick. (Watch the meat occasionally and add more beef broth or water as needed.)

Grits Instructions:

Heat oil/butter in a pot over medium heat. Add diced onion, bell pepper, and chilies and cook for a few minutes or so.

Pour in grits, then add chicken (or beef) broth and water.

Stir, then bring to a boil . Reduce the heat to low, then cover and cook for about 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add half-and-half. Continue to cook and stir until grits are tender.

Remove from heat and stir in grated cheese.

Serve pile of grits with stewed meat (liquid and all) over the top.

Enjoy!